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Shoe Shine Girl

Shoe Shine Girl

Posted 10.24.17 | By Rose Napoli | Comments

If your morning routine involves wearing a suit and escaping the Toronto weather we all love to complain about by hibernating into the PATH at King and Bay, then chances are I have shined your shoes before. That’s right. I am a Shoe Shine Girl (a valet is also a term some use) but I quite like Shoe Shine Girl. There’s something both classic and defiant about it which really suits me. I should firstly specify that I am not an anomaly. There are other Shoe Shine Girls. In fact, the place I work, is almost entirely made up of Shoe Shine Girls. I feel that this is very important to say. I am not special but I am distinctive. If you’ve passed any of the three shoe shines under the PATH that I frequent, you will know it is me. You will know because you will likely have to step over the cord that is charging my computer, or you will trip over any or all of the 4-10 books that litter the surrounding area of the Shine. I will also, undoubtedly, be eating a Burrito.

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ASKING FOR (More Of) IT

ASKING FOR (More Of) IT

Posted 10.12.17 | By Tanisha Taitt | Comments

In August of 2013, psychologist Phil (Dr. Phil) McGraw, for a planned episode of his talk show on the issue of rape and sexual violence amongst youth, tweeted the following question for a survey directed at teen viewers: “If a girl is drunk, is it okay to have sex with her?” The overwhelming public response to the asking of the question was so disturbing to me that it played a role in my decision to re-situate my work as a staunch anti-VAW warrior to a more private and personal vantage point. For years the movement had been the very centerpiece of my life—front and centre. But with every Facebook post and tweet I read blasting Dr. Phil’s question, I grew more disillusioned. I became disheartened at the idea of remaining on the front lines, when it seemed clear that the front lines were a place where my in-the-minority outlook might soon render me unwelcome.

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Not so different

Not so different

Posted 10.04.17 | By Cate McKim | Comments

Nightwood was proud to partner with fu-GEN Theatre for a Reading the 49 presentation of All Our Yesterdays during this year’s Groundswell Festival on Saturday, September 30. Directed by Nightwood AD Kelly Thornton, assisted by Keshia Palm, and starring Rachel Mutombo and Nicole Nwokolo, with stage directions read by Samantha Vu, All Our Yesterdays speaks of the horrifying kidnapping of 276 Nigerian schoolgirls as it follows two sisters in captivity. Eighteen-year-old Ladi (Mutombo) faces the guilt she feels over being responsible for her younger sister Hasana (Nwokolo), a teen with Asperger’s who appears oblivious to the dangers of their situation.

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